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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
at the national museum of scotland. it's opening its doors tomorrow and our scotland correspondent has gone to have a look. >> this is a story of a restless people and a restless nation. scotland's heritage of invention and discovery put this small country on the map. the power of the steam engine revolutionized industry. the television changed the lives of millions. and scots sent back structures from afar. >> scots were great inventors and explore rers and colonial explorers were missionaries. in many ways the stories we tell here are in part the story of scotland's engagement with the rest of the world. >> there are much older tales like t-rex and the national history gallery. in here there are stories of survival and some of the exhibits themselves have survived for decade in the freezer. some date back to the 19th century. now they're being used again to teach the theory of evolution. charles darwin once lived on the site of the museum. he was just a student in scotland but this man's discovery for discoverying penicillin is a gem in they can electic museum. >> we have a chance to brin
in britain today with a second high-level resignation at scotland yard and the death of a whistleblower. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, weç get the latest on the scandal including claims of illegal eavesdropping and bribery by journalists working for rupert murdoch's news corp from ned temko of the "london observer." >> ifill: then, we examine president obama's pick to lead a new consumer protection agency. >> woodruff: from indonesia, ray suarez reports on a nation coming to grips with mental health disorders even as its institutions lock up and chain patients. >> this enormous country has almost no psychiatrists,çç leaving the mentally ill with very few options for treatment. >> ifill: kwame holman brings us the latest on the showdown over raising the government's borrowing limit. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown talks to legendary concert pianist leon fleisher about overcoming a disability that nearly silenced his career. >> if there was a way that i could remain active in music without playing with two hands, well, i had t
a blind eye was turned at scotland yard. >> for more on this uproar and the culture which surrounds the british tabloids, i spoke with a reporter from one the best of this as a result of a unique issue with british tabloid journalism. >> i think there is a different newspaper culture. the national enquirer in america is about as close as you are going to get to some of the tabloid tone that we have in our best selling newspapers. i suppose if you imagine the national enquirer was the best- selling newspaper in america, he would have the understanding of the state of journalism here. >> what are the pressures on reporters and editors to come up with stories like this and sail close to the legal wednesday to separate >> immense. -- close to the legal winds to do this. >> demands. we are in a situation or circulation is falling and there is a battle for readers. that pushes people ever closer to the legal line and the moral line and ethical line of journalism. as we have seen with these latest revelations, hacking into the phones of murder victims, a child murder victims, it's terrible
bombing, still alive, almost two years after he was sent home from scotland with terminal cancer. al-megrahi. we found more of this supporters on the front line with the rebels. nato has not been able to get them to surrender. al has been bombing since march. nato aircraft have made more than 16,000 sorties. they have carried out more than 6000 air strikes. still, the colonel remains. four rebels in eastern libya, moammar gaddafi's fate is cause for argument. some insist he has no future inside his country. >> we understand the libyan people want him to leave the country and power, so this is our stand as of today. >> others suggest that the colonel does not have to go into exile. word that britain and france are prepared to let colonel gaddafi stay inside libya is seen by the supporters of the commonwealth as an admission that nato and the rebels cannot get rid of the libyan leader -- seen by the supporters of colonel gaddafi as an admission. giving up, long before the leader ever does. james reynolds, bbc news, in tripoli. >> you are watching "bbc world news america." still to come
of scotland yard who resigned sunday. the hearings comes after ten arrests and a series of resignatns as fallout from the phone hacking scandal grows. with me john burns, ian katz, deputy he had tortd of the guardian and david karr of the new york city times and sh tyrangiel edito of newsweek. ian katz, what does this day whh rupert murdochcalled the humblest day of his life. what does it change and where do we go from here? >> well, it's not a day we learn an awful lot of significant things. if anything the clearest lesson is wendy dang has a formidable right hook but it was a day of quite striking theatre i think. for in who sits in this country the idea of rupert murdoch who two weeks ago was the most powerful person.country being hauled into parliament to answer questions is prett pretty extraordinary and we had the dialog of him saying it was the humblest day of his lif that w pretty striking. the interesting thing is he and james murdoch came in saying sorry and contrition if you lied but the message was we're sorry but it wasn't else, was someone else's fault and that's the bi
development, scotland yard released a statement accusing unnamed individuals of trying to sabotage its investigation. part of that probe involves allegations that murdoch journalists paid bribes to police for information. rescuers in russia searched a huge reservoir on the volga river today, after a cruise boat sank on sunday. at least 55 people were killed, with 79 rescued and dozens more missing. it happened about 450 miles east of moscow, in windy, rainy conditions. the boat sank in just eight minutes. today, debris was visible in the water as search boats looked for victims and survivors. families stood by, hoping for news. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we turn to africa where a nation is born, but with many troubles. at midnight friday in juba, the capital of the new south sudan, this sign said it all: "free at last". the turning of the clock to july 9, saturday, meant independence, and the creation of the world's newest nation. >> i am sending good luck to all the southern sudanese. >> woodruff: but the jubilation in the streets of
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)